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Warren (G.) Flynn (1950-) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Honors Awards, Writings, Work in Progress, Sidelights

australia western fremantle centre

Born 1950, in Perth, Australia; Education: University of Western Australia, B.A., Dip. Ed., M.A. (with distinction); Northern Territory University, B.Ed. (Indonesian). Hobbies and other interests: Mountain bike riding, fishing, sailing, snorkeling, sewing, movies.

Addresses

Office—c/o Author Mail, Freemantle Arts Centre Press, P.O. Box 158, North Free-mantle 6159, Western Australia.

Warren Flynn

Career

Author and educator. University of Western Australia, Albany, tutor in English and creative writing, 2002-04; Education Department of West Australia, senior teacher.

Honors Awards

Western Australian Young Readers Book Award shortlist, 1994, for Gaz, 1996, for Different Voices, 1997, for Gaz Takes Off, 2001, for Escaping Paradise, and 2003, for Return Ticket; Western Australia Premier's Prize shortlist, 1996, for Different Voices.

Writings

YOUNG-ADULT FICTION

Gaz, Fremantle Arts Centre Press (North Fremantle, Western Australia), 1994.

Different Voices, Fremantle Arts Centre Press (North Fremantle, Western Australia), 1996.

Gaz Takes Off, Fremantle Arts Centre Press (North Fremantle, Western Australia), 1997.

Escaping Paradise, Fremantle Arts Centre Press (North Fremantle, Western Australia), 2001.

Return Ticket, Fremantle Arts Centre Press (North Fremantle, Western Australia), 2003.

Work in Progress

A longer work for adults, taking place in Seoul, South Korea; another YA novel; a children's picture book.

Sidelights

Australian novelist Warren Flynn is the author of several young-adult fiction novels, including Return Ticket, a history-based fantasy set in Australia. After joining their social-studies class aboard a train to take them on a school field trip, Shannon, Sam, and Zak suddenly find themselves one hundred years into the past. Leaving the train and gradually beginning to understand that they have been stranded back in time without any way to return to their own century, the three students are welcomed by a kind girl who allows them to stay and work on her farm in exchange for food and shelter. While School Library Journal reviewer Susan Weitz faulted Return Ticket for its "weaknesses … in character development—even the author sometimes mixes up his two leading males—and in theme," ultimately she praised Flynn's story as "involving" and added that "some readers will enjoy the open ending."

Flynn told Something about the Author: "Students often ask me "What's the best thing about being a writer?" Usually, I tell them it's rare to have a job where you sometimes get paid for daydreaming! But actually the thing which really keeps me writing is the feedback I get from readers. Like guys (sometimes middle secondary students) who tell me that Gaz was the first book they'd ever read! Or the girl who wrote and told me that Different Voices changed the way she thought about refugees. It's those experiences which help me through the dark days when I wonder if it is worth struggling with the next chapter.

"It's been a thrill to meet so many interesting people through research, like wonderful people in Seoul and Candi Dasar (Indonesia) and to also come across readers who, in turn, provide me with inspiration—like Tan Le, a former Vietnamese refugee, and Young Australian of the Year, who is a truly remarkable woman. I enjoy taking my readers—whether they're on their first novel or one of a thousand—to somewhere they haven't been or to meet someone who encourages them to see things afresh."

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

School Library Journal, March, 2004, Susan Weitz, review of Return Ticket, p. 210.

ONLINE

Warren Flynn's Homepage, http://www.members.iinet.net/au/~wgmn/firstpage/firstpage.html/ (May 31, 2004).*

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about 2 years ago

Reviewer, Susan Weitz, misread the endings of the novel, Return Ticket. The author (nor many other reviewers) did NOT mix up the main characters.

Fair criticism is fine; inaccurate poor reading should not be given credence.