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Suzy Kline (1943-) Biography - Personal, Career, Member, Honors Awards, Writings, Adaptations, Work in Progress, Sidelights

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Born 1943, in Berkeley, CA; Education: Attended Columbia University; University of California, Berkeley, B.A., 1966; California State College (now University), Hayward, Standard Elementary Credential, 1967. Politics: Democrat. Religion: Presbyterian. Hobbies and other interests: Writing, walking, dancing, sports, reading, movies and plays, playing and reading with her four grandchildren, traveling with her husband, taking her mom to church.

Career

Elementary schoolteacher in Richmond, CA, 1968-71; Southwest School, Torrington, CT, elementary teacher, 1976-2000. University of Connecticut, Storrs, graduate instructor in teaching children's literature, 2001-03. Makes author visits to schools and conducts workshops for teachers.

Suzy Kline

Member

Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, PEN, New England Reading Association, Connecticut Education Association, Torrington Education Association.

Honors Awards

Best books, Christian Science Monitor, 1985, and West Virginia Children's Book Award, 1987-88, for Herbie Jones; Editor's Choice, Booklist, 1986, for What's the Matter with Herbie Jones?; International Reading Association Children's Choice Awards, 1986, for Herbie Jones, 1987, for What's the Matter with Herbie Jones?, 1989, for Horrible Harry in Room 2-B, 1990, for Orp, and 1991, for Orp and the Chop Suey Burgers; School District Teacher of the Year Award, State of Connecticut, 1987; Probus Educator of the Year Award, 1988.

Writings

FOR CHILDREN

Shhhh!, illustrated by Dora Leder, Albert Whitman (Morton Grove, IL), 1984.

Don't Touch!, illustrated by Dora Leder, Albert Whitman (Morton Grove, IL), 1985.

Ooops!, illustrated by Dora Leder, Albert Whitman (Morton Grove, IL), 1987.

The Hole Book, illustrated by Laurie Newton, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Molly's in a Mess ("Molly Zander" series), illustrated by Diana Cain Blumenthal, Putnam (New York, NY), 1999.

Molly Gets Mad ("Molly Zander" series), illustrated by Diana Cain Blumenthal, Putnam (New York, NY), 2001.

"HERBIE JONES" SERIES

Herbie Jones, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1985.

What's the Matter with Herbie Jones?, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1986.

Herbie Jones and the Class Gift, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1987.

Herbie Jones and the Monster Ball, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1988.

Herbie Jones and Hamburger Head, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

The Herbie Jones Reader's Theater, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Herbie Jones and the Dark Attic, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Herbie Jones and the Birthday Showdown, illustrated by Carl Cassler, Putnam (New York, NY), 1993.

Herbie Jones Moves On, illustrated by Richard Williams, Putnam (New York, NY), 2003.

"HORRIBLE HARRY" SERIES

Horrible Harry in Room 2-B, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1988.

Horrible Harry and the Green Slime, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1989.

Horrible Harry and the Ant Invasion, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1989.

Horrible Harry's Secret, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1990.

Horrible Harry and the Christmas Surprise, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1991.

Horrible Harry and the Kickball Wedding, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1992.

Horrible Harry and the Dungeon, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1996.

Horrible Harry and the Purple People, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1997.

Horrible Harry and the Drop of Doom, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1998.

Horrible Harry Moves up to Third Grade, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1998.

Horrible Harry Goes to the Moon, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2000.

Horrible Harry at Halloween, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2000.

Horrible Harry Goes to Sea, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2001.

Horrible Harry and the Dragon War, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2002.

Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2003.

Horrible Harry and the Holidaze, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2003.

Horrible Harry and the Locked Closet, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2004.

Horrible Harry and the Goog, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 2005.

"SONG LEE" SERIES

Song Lee in Room 2-B, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1993.

Song Lee and the Hamster Hunt, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1994.

Song Lee and the Leech Man, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1995.

Song Lee and the "I Hate You" Notes, illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz, Viking (New York, NY), 1999.

"ORP" SERIES

Orp, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Orp and the Chop Suey Burgers, Putnam (New York, NY), 1990.

Orp Goes to the Hoop, Putnam (New York, NY), 1991.

Who's Orp's Girlfriend?, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Orp and the FBI, Putnam (New York, NY), 1995.

"MARY MARONY" SERIES

Mary Marony and the Snake, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Mary Marony Hides Out, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 1993.

Mary Marony Mummy Girl, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 1994.

Mary Marony and the Chocolate Surprise, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 1995.

Marvin and the Mean Words, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 1997.

Marvin and the Meanest Girl, illustrated by Blanche Sims, Putnam (New York, NY), 2000.

Also author of plays for local elementary school. Contributor to Instructor.

Adaptations

Several of Kline's books have been recorded as audiobooks.

Work in Progress

A prequel series of "Herbie Jones" books, beginning with Herbie Jones Likes Ice Cream Cones, for Putnam.

Sidelights

Suzy Kline should know a lot about kids; she has devoted much of her adult life to working as a secondgrade teacher and more recently a third-grade teacher, inspiring young children with a love of reading that she hopes will remain with them throughout their lives. The author of several series of award-winning books featuring realistic characters like third grader Herbie Jones, second-grade stutterer Mary Marony, a basketball-crazy middle schooler who goes by the nickname "Orp," Horrible Harry the rambunctious nemesis of room 2-B (and 3-B once he and his friends move to third grade), and the object of Harry's affections, Song Lee, Kline has a sure-fire ability to create true-to-life plots, which she relates in a humorous way that includes plenty of down-to-earth humor. Her "characters are all well defined, with their own unique personalities finely drawn," noted Cheryl Cufari in an appraisal of one of Kline's books for School Library Journal. Pat Leach, reviewing a book from the "Mary Marony" series in School Library Journal added that "Kline understands the dynamics of relationships in the primary grades." Critics have consistently complimented Kline's books as stories that would genuinely fit into an everyday classroom setting.

Kline was born in Berkeley, California, in 1943. Her first foray into writing occurred when she was eight years old. She once explained, "I wrote letters to my grandfather in Indiana, telling him what was happening at our house. It seemed to me that he missed his son—my dad—very much, and he would be interested in hearing about him. Our home in California was three thousand miles away. My aunt told me that my letters helped him live a little longer, which made me feel really good about writing."

After high school Kline attended Columbia University for a year before transferring to the University of California, Berkeley, where she received her bachelor's degree in 1966; she earned her teaching credentials the following year. In 1968 Kline got a job teaching in an elementary school in Richmond, California, where she remained for three years. She also married Rufus O. Kline, a local college teacher and writer, and together they had two daughters. In 1976 the Kline family moved to New England, and they have made their home in Connecticut ever since.

Kline's first books for children were picture books. In 1984's Shhhh!, an energetic, chatty youngster lists all the people who tell her to pipe down during the day, until she tiptoes out of doors to make all the noise she possibly can before she settles down to being quiet again. "Delightful," lauded School Library Journal contributor Lisa Redd, noting that the book portrays "a situation common to all children." Don't Touch! finds young Dan similarly reprimanded: sharp edges, hot pans, wet paint, and the like are barriers to his curiosity. Finally, he gets hold of some modeling clay, which he can touch to his heart's content in this picture book that Joan McGrath noted in School Library Journal should be "satisfying to kids who are constantly admonished to keep hands off."

Kline introduced the first of her popular elementary-school characters in Herbie Jones. A reluctant reader, Herbie tries to get out of the "slow" class while finding that causing trouble seems to impress his peers. Finally, he sets his mind on his schoolwork, and his grades start to climb. Booklist contributor Ilene Cooper offered a favorable assessment of Kline's "shrewd depictions of childhood concerns," and added that Herbie has "a fine supporting cast of characters." What's the Matter with Herbie Jones? finds our young hero in a romantic muddle as he falls head over heels for Annabelle Louisa Hodgekiss. When his friends catch him reading poetry and being seen with a GIRL in public, they take swift—and humorous—action to save their comrade, in a book that Cooper, writing in Booklist, called "a fun read." Other books featuring the popular third-grader include Herbie Jones and the Monster Ball, called "another sure winner" by a Publishers Weekly reviewer, in which Herbie tries out for the local baseball team coached by his favorite uncle, and Herbie Jones and the Dark Attic, as Herbie, now a fourth grader, is bumped up to an attic bedroom—much to his dismay—when Grandpa comes for a long-term visit. Kline has also begun a new series of "Herbie Jones" books that find Herbie in the second grade; the series kicks off with Herbie Jones Likes Ice Cream Cones.

In Horrible Harry in Room 2-B, readers meet the impish Harry as seen through the eyes of his best friend, Doug. Dubbed "horrible" in a lighthearted way, Harry loves to play practical jokes, especially when they prompt screams of terror from second-grade girls. Kline illustrates each of Harry's antics in short chapters; in Horrible Harry and the Green Slime, he not only concocts some nasty green slime, but drapes the school with spider webs and gets involved in other mischief, fitting "comfortably into the genre of light classroom realism" according to Betsy Hearne of Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books. Horrible Harry's Secret teams Harry with fellow classmate Song Lee, a Korean girl who has a water frog that eats liver—a sure-fire magnet for second-grade boys. But Harry is attracted to more than the frog; falling for Song Lee sends him into a tizzy. "Harry's appeal is that he's both 'gross' and vulnerable," according to Booklist contributor Hazel Rochman, who found Kline's classroom tales full of kid appeal. Commenting on Horrible Harry and the Kickball Wedding, Rochman stated, "Grade-school teacher Kline evokes the farce of the classroom, and just a glimpse of the hurt, too." In Horrible Harry and the Drop of Doom, Song Lee invites Harry, Doug, and some of their classmates on a trip to Mountainside Amusement Park; Harry is delighted until his arch-nemesis, Sidney, tells him about one of the rides—a 13-story elevator drop—and Harry, who was once stuck inside an elevator, has to face his fears. Kay Weisman of Booklist commented on Kline's "breezy text."

Harry and his classmates "loop together," all ending up in the same third grade class, and their adventures continue. In Horrible Harry Moves up to the Third Grade, Harry must again confront Sidney, who in this book kills Harry's pet spider. "Harry's many fans will clamor for this enjoyable story," assured Booklist contributor Lauren Peterson. Harry disappoints his classmates by not dressing as something scary in Horrible Harry at Halloween. He explains that he is Sergeant Joe Friday of the LAPD, and when one of his classmates realizes part of her costume is missing, it's up to Harry to solve the mystery. "Harry's detective work is delicious," praised Hazel Rochman in her review for Booklist. Class 3-B goes on a riverboat trip in Horrible Harry Goes to Sea; everything goes swimmingly until Song Lee discovers that Sidney is missing. The class scrambles to make sure that he hasn't gone overboard. The book focuses less on Harry than previous titles, but Ashley Larsen in School Library Journal noted that fans will "still enjoy the class's exploits" and Carolyn Phelan, writing for Booklist, said that readers would "happily climb aboard" to spend more time with class 3-B.

In Horrible Harry and the Dragon War Harry and Song Lee agree to work on a project on dragons together, only to realize that they have completely different ideas about dragons. When Harry calls Song Lee's dragon "stupid," their fight begins. Karen Hutt in Booklist commented that "Kline perfectly captures the difficulties of learning about differing opinions." A contributor to Kirkus Reviews praised Kline for allowing "the young protagonists to solve their own problems … with light adult intervention, good intentions, and gentle forgiveness." In Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins, Harry is at his troublemaking again. When Sidney tries to get class 3-B to tease Harry for wearing a necklace, Harry explains that the charm he's wearing is actually a mini-microscope, with which he can see the kingdom of mushrooms. He offers to show his classmates, but in order to do it, they have to sneak off school grounds during recess, which is against the rules. The children follow anyway, but when their teacher asks where all the mud came from after recess and Harry tells her a lie, the children have to decide if they should support his fib or tell the truth. A contributor to Kirkus Reviews called the book "Another winner," and Hazel Rochman of Booklist called it "one of the best" in the "Horrible Harry" series. Room 3-B celebrates the winter holidays in Horrible Harry and the Holidaze. Harry isn't up to his normal antics, however, and his friend Doug begins to worry when even Harry's obvious crush on Song Lee seems to have faded. The truth is that Harry's great-grandfather has gone to live in a nursing home, and when the teacher finds out, she takes the whole class to visit, which cheers Harry up entirely. "The depiction of Harry's sadness … is sensitive," commented Carolyn Phelan in Booklist.

Song Lee has several books in which she is not just the object of Harry's affections, but is the focus of the story.

In Song Lee and the Hamster Hunt, she brings yet another pet to school and someone leaves the cage open. "Amusing characterizations, snappy dialogue, and a happy ending" distinguish this book, according to a Kirkus Reviews critic. Although Song Lee is shy, her sensitivity to animals and troubled classmates in Song Lee in Room 2B prompted Maggie McEwen to remark in School Library Journal that "Kline has an exceptional talent for capturing the language, humor, and group dynamics of a primary-grade classroom." In Song Lee and the Leech Man, Sidney tattles on Song Lee, and Harry vows to avenge her. When Harry's practical joke on Sidney fails, Harry ends up falling in the pond, covered with leeches. "Song Lee comes to the rescue and saves the day," wrote April Judge in Booklist. In Song Lee and the "I Hate You Notes," someone is sending hate notes to Song Lee, even though she is the nicest person in the class. Song Lee is hurt by the notes, but gets her revenge in a very creative and unhurtful way.

Orville Rudemeyer Pygenski, Jr., survives elementary school only with the use of a nickname, Orp. When he starts an "I hate my name" club during the summer vacation after sixth grade class, he realizes that he is not alone in wishing his parents had been a little less creative when he was born. In Orp Goes to the Hoop, the young teen decides that a good way to avoid chores is to join the middle school basketball team. Ultimately, he becomes one of the team's star players, balancing his new sport with a long-distance romance with a girl named Jenny Lee. "Something for older Matt Christopher fans," recommended a Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books contributor, "who have noticed girls." Orp's social life gets complicated in Who's Orp's Girlfriend? when two different girls at school catch his eye, while longtime pen-pal Jenny Lee announces that she is coming for a visit. "Kline's gentle humor, well-paced plot, and likeable characters" are "just right" for middle school readers, wrote Booklist contributor Chris Sherman. Orp and the FBI tells of Orp and his private detective agency, Famous Bathtub Investigators (FBI), and his rival, sister Chloe's CIA (Chloe's Investigation Agency). "The plot develops smoothly … the level of suspense is maintained," commented School Library Journal contributor Carol Torrance, who added: "A fun addition."

Kline's first heroine to have her own series was Mary Marony, a new second-grader at school. In Mary Marony and the Snake Mary fears being teased because of her speech impediment: she stutters. Her fears are realized in at least one student, meanie Marvin Higgins, who makes her school day miserable. Fortunately, with the help of a speech teacher, Mary gets her stutter under control, and when she is the only one in her class brave enough to pick up a snake that has gotten loose in the classroom, Marvin's taunts can do little to tarnish her reputation among her classmates. "Any child who's been teased (that is, any child) will enjoy Mary's triumph," Roger Sutton asserted, while School Library Journal contributor Gale W. Sherman suggested: "Make room on the shelves for this one—young readers will love it." In the entertaining Mary Marony Mummy Girl, Halloween is around the corner and Mary wants to be a mummy—but where to find a costume? Without permission, she rips up her bedsheet, which works fine as a costume but makes her mom more than a little upset. Kline's spunky protagonist is "resourceful," dealing with both her stutter and "other challenges in a positive manner," maintained Elaine Lesh Morgan, describing the book in School Library Journal. Mary Marony and the Chocolate Surprise, hailed by Stephanie Zvirin of Booklist as "one of Kline's best," raises the moral question of whether cheating is always wrong. In Marvin and the Mean Words, bully Marvin takes the spotlight, learning what it feels like to be the target of someone's taunting. Hazel Rochman, writing in Booklist, noted that "Kline's touch is light," and praised the reality of her classroom scenarios. Marvin returns in Marvin and the Meanest Girl, in which he squares off against girlbully, Lucy Tinker. The taunting escalates until Marvin learns that Lucy's grandmother has just died, and she's being mean to cover up her own hurt. "The school action is fast, the talk is lively," wrote Hazel Rochman in Booklist.

Third-grade Molly Zander's series began in 1999 with Molly's in a Mess. The stories are narrated by Molly's best friend, Morty, who is the more cautious one of the pair. In her first adventure, Molly gets in trouble for accidentally knocking off the principal's hairpiece. When she and Morty explain, Molly is forgiven, but Molly is out for revenge on Florence, the girl who told on her. Though Molly manages to embarrass Florence in front of the whole class, she and Florence both learn some lessons about how to treat their peers, and eventually become friends. A reviewer for Publishers Weekly noted that Molly's in a Mess "exhibits her usual flair for elementary school antics." In Molly's second book, Molly Gets Mad, it looks like her friendship with Morty might be over. The two friends have an ice-skating race, which Molly wins—but only because Morty breaks his ankle in the process. When Molly gets in a snit because no one congratulates her and Morty tells her she's a poor sport, it seems like they'll never be able to make things right. But Morty finds himself still cheering her on when she's playing hockey. "The real action here is off the rink," commented Pat Leach in School Library Journal. Ellen Mandel in Booklist praised Kline's depiction of "Molly's humorous and true-to-life antics."

"Most of my stories have been inspired by the classroom, my family and my childhood," Kline once told SATA. "Everyday life is full of stories if we just take the time to write them." Since her retirement from teaching in 2000, Kline has been able to travel from her native New England and devote more time to visiting students in other parts of the United States; as she told SATA: "I always take my pocket notebook with me and jot down things that inspire me to write a new story. My newest 'Herbie' (the prequel series) and Horrible Harry and the Goog books have many story details from the schools I visited this year." She credits "some wonderful custodians and teachers" for providing details on story and settings for Horrible Harry and the Goog, which finds Herbie's cat Goog prowling the South School teacher's lounge, teacher's restroom, and boiler room.

"I think I could go on forever writing about Herbie Jones and Horrible Harry and Song Lee," Kline added. "To me, these series are about family, friendships, and the classroom, three things that are so close to my heart. Most of all, I am blessed with a strong Christian faith, and that has made all the difference in my life."

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

Booklist, August, 1985, Ilene Cooper, review of Herbie Jones, p. 1666; December 1, 1986, Ilene Cooper, review of What's the Matter with Herbie Jones?, p. 579; October 15, 1988, p. 410; November 1, 1988, p. 484; November 1, 1989, p. 553; December 1, 1990, Hazel Rochman, review of Horrible Harry's Secret, p. 751; July, 1991, p. 2048; July, 1992, p. 1941; October 1, 1992, Hazel Rochman, review of Horrible Harry and the Kickball Wedding, p. 327; August, 1993, Chris Sherman, review of Who's Orp's Girlfriend, p. 2062; November 15, 1994, pp. 601-602; April 15, 1995, p. 1500; October 1, 1995, April Judge, review of Song Lee and the Leech Man, p. 316; December 1, 1995, Stephanie Zvirin, review of Mary Marony and the Chocolate Surprise, p. 636; April 1, 1997, Hazel Rochman, review of Marvin and the Mean Words, p. 1334; February 15, 1998, Kay Weisman, review of Horrible Harry and the Drop of Doom, p. 1012; October 15, 1998, Lauren Peterson, review of Horrible Harry Moves up to Third Grade, p. 422; May 1, 1999, Hazel Rochman, review of Song Lee and the "I Hate You" Notes, p. 1594; August, 1999, Lauren Peterson, review of Molly's in a Mess, p. 2058; September 15, 2000, Hazel Rochman, review of Horrible Harry at Halloween, p. 241; November 1, 2000, Hazel Rochman, review of Marvin and the Meanest Girl, p. 540; September 1, 2001, Ellen Mandel, review of Molly Gets Mad, p. 106; December 1, 2001, Carolyn Phelan, review of Horrible Harry Goes to Sea, p. 643; June 1, 2002, Karen Hutt, review of Horrible Harry and the Dragon War, p. 1740; March 15, 2003, Hazel Rochman, review of Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins, p. 1327; September 1, 2003, Carolyn Phelan, review of Horrible Harry and the Holidaze, p. 134.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, October, 1984, p. 29; December, 1985, pp. 70-71; December, 1986, pp. 70-71; May, 1989, Betsy Hearne, review of Horrible Harry and the Green Slime, p. 227; July-August, 1991, review of Orp Goes to the Hoop, pp. 266-267; June, 1992, Roger Sutton, review of Mary Marony and the Snake, pp. 266-267.

Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 1989, p. 295; July 15, 1994, review of Song Lee and the Hamster Hunt, p. 987; September 15, 2001, review of Horrible Harry Goes to Sea, p. 1360; April 15, 2002, review of Horrible Harry and the Dragon War, p. 572; February 1, 2003, review of Horrible Harry and the Mud Gremlins, p. 233.

Publishers Weekly, October 30, 1987, p. 72; March 3, 1997, p. 76; September 8, 1988, review of Herbie Jones and the Monster Ball, p. 135; August 2, 1999, review of Molly's in a Mess, p. 84; November 1, 1999, review of Orp, p. 86.

School Library Journal, February, 1985, Lisa Redd, review of Shhhh!, p. 66; February, 1986, Joan McGrath, review of Don't Touch, p. 76; March, 1988, p. 192; April, 1989, pp. 102-103; July, 1992, pp. 69-70; December, 1992, Cheryl Cufari, review of Herbie Jones and the Dark Attic, p. 85; April, 1993, Gale W. Sherman, review of Mary Marony and the Snake, p. 98; July, 1993, p. 86; September, 1993, Maggie McEwen, review of Song Lee in Room 2B, pp. 209-210; November, 1993, p. 85; September, 1994, p. 187; December, 1994, Elaine Lesh Morgan, review of Mary Marony Mummy Girl, p. 77; May, 1995, Carol Torrance, review of Orp and the FBI, p. 108; December, 1995, p. 83; May, 1997, Elisabeth Palmer Abarbanel, review of Marvin and the Mean Words, p. 102; September, 1997, Carrie A. Guarria, review of Horrible Harry and the Purple People, p. 184; August, 1998, Suzanne Hawley, review of Horrible Harry and the Drop of Doom, p. 142; September, 1998, Linda Binder, review of Horrible Harry Moves up to Third Grade, p. 175; June, 1999, Pat Leach, review of Song Lee and the "I Hate You" Notes, p. 99; August, 1999, Maggie McEwen, review of Molly's in a Mess, p. 138; February, 2000, Pat Leach, review of Horrible Harry Goes to the Moon, p. 96; September, 2000, Janie Schomberg, review of Horrible Harry at Halloween, p. 202; August, 2001, Pat Leach, review of Molly Gets Mad, p. 155; November, 2001, Ashley Larsen, review of Horrible Harry Goes to Sea, p. 127; August, 2002, Laurie von Mehren, review of Horrible Harry and the Dragon War, p. 159; October, 2003, Eva Mitnick, review of Horrible Harry and the Holidaze, p. 65.

ONLINE

Suzy Kline's Home Page, http://www.suzykline.com/ (April 1, 2004).

Richard A. Knaak (1961–) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Member, Writings, Sidelights [next]

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over 2 years ago

her books are great!