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Demi (Demi) Hitz (1942-) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Member, Honors Awards, Writings, Sidelights

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Born 1942, in Cambridge, MA; Education: Attended Instituto Allende and Rhode Island School of Design; Immaculate Heart College, B.A., 1962; University of Baroda, Gujarat, India, Master's degree, 1963; additional graduate study at China Institute. Hobbies and other interests: Travel (has been to Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, Chile, England, and Japan).

Addresses

Agent—Julian Bach, Inc., 747 Third Ave., New York, NY 10017.

Career

Artist and writer. Speaker at colleges, universities, libraries, and children's events.

Member

China Institute.

Honors Awards

Fulbright fellow, 1962; awards from Boston Globe scholastic competitions, California State Fair, California Arts and Science Fair, Los Angeles County Museum, and Los Angeles Outdoor Art Festival, all 1961-62; No-table Book selection, American Library Association, 1980, for Liang and the Magic Paintbrush; New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book selection, 1985, for The Nightingale; International Reading Association Notable Book for a Global Society selection, for Grass Sandals: The Travels of Basho; Aesop Accolades, Children's Folklore Section of American Folklore Society, 1999, for The Donkey and the Rock; New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book selection, 2001, and Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Platinum Award, both for Gandhi.

Writings

SELF-ILLUSTRATED, UNDER NAME DEMI

The Book of Moving Pictures, Knopf (New York, NY), 1979.

Under the Shade of the Mulberry Tree, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1979.

Where Is It?, Doubleday (New York, NY), 1980.

Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, Holt (New York, NY), 1980.

The Leaky Umbrella, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1980.

The Adventures of Marco Polo, Holt (New York, NY), 1981.

Three Little Elephants, Random House (New York, NY), 1981.

Follow the Line (wordless story), Holt (New York, NY), 1981.

Where Is Willie Worm?, Random House (New York, NY), 1981.

Cinderella on Wheels, Holt (New York, NY), 1982.

Peek-A-Boo, Random House (New York, NY), 1982.

Watch Harry Growl, Random House (New York, NY), 1984.

Demi's Find the Animal A B C: An Alphabet-Game Book, Putnam (New York, NY), 1985.

Demi's Count the Animals 1, 2, 3, Putnam (New York, NY), 1986.

Dragon Kites and Dragonflies: A Collection of Chinese Nursery Rhymes, Harcourt (New York, NY), 1986.

So Soft Kitty, Putnam (New York, NY), 1986.

Fuzzy Wuzzy Puppy, Putnam (New York, NY), 1986.

Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, Dodd (New York, NY), 1987.

Cuddly Chick, Putnam (New York, NY), 1987.

Fluffy Bunny, Grosset (New York, NY), 1987.

Demi's Opposites, Grosset (New York, NY), 1987.

Downy Duckling, Putnam (New York, NY), 1987.

Fleecy Lamb, Putnam (New York, NY), 1987.

The Hallowed Horse: A Folktale from India, Putnam (New York, NY), 1987.

A Chinese Zoo: Fables and Proverbs, Harcourt (New York, NY), 1988.

Demi's Reflective Fables, Putnam (New York, NY), 1988.

Find Demi's Dinosaurs: An Animal Game Book, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Jolly Koala Bear, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Roly Poly Panda, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Demi's Basket of Books, Grosset (New York, NY), 1989.

Demi's Christmas Surprise, Putnam (New York, NY), 1990.

The Empty Pot, Holt (New York, NY), 1990.

Find Demi's Baby Animals, Putnam (New York, NY), 1990.

The Magic Boat, Holt (New York, NY), 1990.

Find Demi's Sea Creatures: An Animal Game Book, Putnam (New York, NY), 1991.

The Artist and the Architect, Holt (New York, NY), 1991.

Chingis Khan, Holt (New York, NY), 1991.

Little Bitty Bunny, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Little Chick Chick, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

In the Eyes of the Cat: Japanese Poetry for All Seasons, translated by Tze Si Huang, Holt (New York, NY), 1992.

Little Baby Lamb, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992.

Demi's Dozen Farm Friends, Holt (New York, NY), 1992.

Little Lucky Ducky, Putnam (New York, NY), 1993.

Demi's Secret Garden, Holt (New York, NY), 1993.

Demi's Dragons and Fantastic Creatures, Holt (New York, NY), 1993.

Demi's Dozen Good Eggs, Holt (New York, NY), 1993.

Demi's Dozen Dinosaurs, Holt (New York, NY), 1994.

Santa's Furry Friends, Holt (New York, NY), 1994.

The Magic Tapestry: A Chinese Folktale, Holt (New York, NY), 1994.

The Firebird: A Russian Folktale, Holt (New York, NY), 1994.

The Stonecutter, Crown (New York, NY), 1995.

Buddha, Holt (New York, NY), 1995.

The Dragon's Tale and Other Animal Fables of the Chinese Zodiac, Holt (New York, NY), 1996.

Su Tong Po, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1996.

Buddha Stories, Holt (New York, NY), 1997.

One Grain of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1997.

The Greatest Treasure, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1998.

The Dalai Lama: A Biography of the Tibetan Spiritual and Political Leader, Holt (New York, NY), 1998.

Happy New Year!: Kung-hsi Fa-Ts'ai!, Crown (New York, NY), 1998.

The Donkey and the Rock, Holt (New York, NY), 1999.

Kites: Magic Wishes That Fly up to the Sky, Crown (New York, NY), 1999.

The Emperor's New Clothes: A Tale Set in China, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2000.

King Midas: The Golden Touch, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Gandhi, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Muhammad, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2003.

The Legend of Saint Nicholas, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Happy, Happy Chinese New Year!, Crown (New York, NY), 2003.

The Hungry Coat: A Tale from Turkey, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2004.

The Greatest Power, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Mother Teresa, Margaret K. McElderry Books (New York, NY), 2005.

ILLUSTRATOR

Partap Sharma, The Surangini Tales, Harcourt (New York, NY), 1973.

Lu Yu, The Classic of Tea, translation by Francis Ross Carpenter, Little, Brown (Boston, MA), 1974.

Smith and Wardhough, Feelings, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1975.

Tom Glazer, The Tom Glazer Guitar Book, Warner Brothers, 1976.

Francis Ross Carpenter, The Old China Trade: Americans in Canton, 1784-1843, Coward, 1976.

ILLUSTRATOR; UNDER NAME DEMI

Augusta Goldin, The Shape of Water, Doubleday (New York, NY), 1979.

Yushin Yoo, Bong Nam and the Pheasants, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1979.

Jane Yolen, Dragon Night and Other Lullabies, Methuen (London, England), 1980.

Ann S. McGrath, Tone's Tunnel, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1981.

Miriam Chaikin, Light Another Candle: The Story and Meaning of Hanukkah, Clarion Books (New York, NY), 1981.

Chaikin, Make Noise, Make Merry: The Story and Meaning of Purim, Ticknor & Fields (New York, NY), 1986.

Hans Christian Andersen, The Nightingale, Harcourt (New York, NY), 1988.

Hans Christian Andersen, Thumbelina, Putnam (New York, NY), 1989.

Ann Tompert, Bamboo Hats and a Rice Cake, Crown (New York, NY), 1993.

Aleksandr Pushkin, The Magic Gold Fish: A Russian Folktale, Holt (New York, NY), 1995.

J. Alison James, Eucalyptus Wings, Atheneum (New York, NY), 1995.

Dawnine Spivak, Grass Sandals: The Travels of Basho, Atheneum (New York, NY), 1997.

Illustrator of Time-Life Television's The Wild, Wild World of Animals: The Cats, Vineyard Books, 1976. Adapter and illustrator of Lu Pan, the Carpenter's Apprentice, Prentice-Hall, 1978. Also illustrator of selected titles in "All about Your Name" series by Tom Glazer, Doubleday, 1978. Contributor of illustrations and stories to periodicals, including New Yorker, Young Children, New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Art News, China Trade Journal, and House and Garden.

Sidelights

Known for her richly detailed and often brightly colored illustrations heavily influenced by Eastern themes, illustrator Demi has created over a hundred books for children. Among these are adaptations of Chinese folktales, fables, and nursery rhymes, picture-book biographies, concept and puzzle books portraying animals from insects to dragons, as well as a series of novelty board books with very tactile furry animals. Throughout her books runs the recurrent motif of things Oriental, the influence not only of her travels in India and China, but also of her personal interest in Buddhism. Reviewers have praised Demi's imaginative designs and her use of color, as well as her ability to blend text and illustration in her books for children.

Born Charlotte Dumaresq Hunt, on September 2, 1942, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the illustrator uses a childhood nickname for her professional name. "Demi" is what her father called her when he first saw his diminutive baby daughter, and the name stuck. She was seemingly destined by biology for a career in the arts, as she grew up in one of the first families of American art. The great-granddaughter of American painter William Morris Hunt, great-grandniece of revered architect Richard Morris Hunt—known for his work on the Metropolitan Museum of Art—Demi grew up in a household where self-expression was encouraged. Her mother was a painter of note and her father was deeply involved in the theater. She was introduced to actor Sir John Gielgud and mime Marcel Marceau, as part of her family's social life.

Demi's mother encouraged Demi and guided her education of studio art, silk-screening, jewelry-making, mural painting, and ceramics. From an early age, she was drawn to Oriental design and art. As Demi noted in an interview with Patricia Austin in Teaching and Learning Literature, she always had a preference for Eastern over Western art. "Even as a little girl when my mother would take me to the Museum of Fine Arts to see something like Cezanne, I always felt something was missing and was much happier to be home looking at the Ming vases." She has also been strongly influenced by the classic Chinese book, The Mustard Seed Garden Manual of Painting, and by the concept of Ch'i, "the breath and vital force and essence of all life, pervading the universe," as Demi explained it in her interview with Austin. "Ch'i pervades both the paintbrush and yourself which is what I try to speak of when I speak of painting."

Attendance at the Rhode Island School of Design and a bachelor's degree from the innovative art program at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles helped expand Demi's sense of what art consists of. At Immaculate Heart College, she studied under Sister Maria Corita, known for her silk screen printing as well as her rebellious stance vis-a-vis the pope. These studies were followed by a Master's degree in 1963 from the University of Baroda, Gujarat, India. During this same period, Demi traveled widely, visiting Brazil, then India where she was a Fulbright scholar from 1962 to 1963, and somewhat later China. Demi did not begin illustrating children's books until the late 1970s, but already she was an artist with a growing reputation as a painter. She painted murals in Mexico, walls for modern homes, and the dome of St. Peter and Paul Church in Wilmington, California. There have been exhibitions of her work all over the United States and in India. A filmstrip about Demi's work titled "Making Mosaics" was shown in Boston on CBS-TV.

Demi's first picture book, Lu Pan, the Carpenter's Apprentice, appeared in 1978, and set the tone for much of her later work. Part biography and part adapted folktale, the book tells the story of a young apprentice growing up in China in the fifth century, B.C., and how he ultimately becomes a master carpenter and one of China's greatest architects and inventors. The adapted text is accompanied by Demi's signature illustrations, "precise ink drawings" which are "clean and shining, their delicacy strongly evocative of the genius about whom she writes," according to Denise M. Wilms in a Booklist review. A critic in Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books pointed out how the black and white drawings are "spare and precise in the Oriental tradition."

Numerous other adaptations of folktales have followed and form, perhaps, the core of Demi's work. Best known of these are Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, The Empty Pot, The Artist and the Architect, The Magic Tapestry, and The Stonecutter. The story of a poor boy who wants to paint and is given a magic paintbrush that brings his pictures to life is the subject of Liang and the Magic Paintbrush. Booklist's Barbara Elleman noted that Demi's "telling … moves gracefully in keeping with fragile lines and gentle touches of color found in the illustrations," while a Publishers Weekly reviewer commented that the author/illustrator's text "matches her art in fantastic effects" with delicate "shades of gold and blue" contrasting "with fiery scarlets in surpassingly beautiful [pictures]." Magic also figures into Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, in which a poor but honest woodcutter is rewarded with an axe which has magic properties. A Publishers Weekly critic observed that in this "plainly told tale of opposing moral concepts," the clear text together with the illustrations communicate "intention" well. Ilene Cooper, writing in Booklist, commented that Demi depicts the magical happenings of the story with paints "mixed from malachite, azurite, and cinnabar to produce a palette of both pastels and hot, bright colors."

In her interview with Austin, Demi discussed the materials she uses in her illustrations. "I paint with traditional paints," she explained. "Black from 10 parts pine soot, blues and greens from azurite, malachite, and indigo, reds from cinnabar, realgar, and orpiment with brilliant red from a flowering vine, umbar from iron oxide called limonite, yellow from the sap of the rattan plant, and white from lead or pulverized oyster shells." She mixes these colors with stag horn, fish, or ox glue, or even glue made from the pulp of the soap bean. For good fortune, she also adds powdered jade. Her magic brushes include ones made from sheep, goat, rabbit, weasel, and wolf hairs. "For extremely fine work, a brush of one mouse whisker is used," she added.

More magic is served up in further Chinese tales, The Magic Boat and The Magic Tapestry, and in a Russian folktale by Aleksandr Pushkin, The Magic Gold Fish. In The Magic Tapestry, a loyal son is rewarded when the beautiful princess woven into his mother's tapestry comes to life to be his bride. Booklist's Julie Corsaro noted that the "grandeur of the story is enhanced by the liberal use of shimmering gold," and concluded that Demi's "delicate paintings" are reminiscent of ancient Chinese hanging scrolls. Gold indeed is a favorite color of Demi's, a penchant for which goes back to her youth when she once bought a plastic golden Buddha. She still keeps that plastic Buddha with her.

Her books of folktales are inspired by the legends of China, both written and handed down orally. The Empty Pot was one of several tales told to Demi by her husband, who she referred to as "my built-in research center" to Austin. In the tale, Ping is a boy who loves growing flowers. When the emperor passes out seeds to the children and proclaims that the one to grow the best flower will be the next ruler, Ping does his best to grow a magnificent flower. However, nothing comes of his work. While all the other children have glorious blossoms, Ping's flower pot is empty, and this he presents to the emperor. In the end, though, honesty is rewarded, for the emperor has cooked all the seeds—none should have sprouted. "Only honest Ping has the right stuff to be Emperor," commented Booklist's Cooper, who went on to note that Demi's "precise pen-and-watercolor art works especially well here." Horn Book contributor Ellen Fader also praised the illustrations, which are "set in an oval in the shape of a flat Chinese fan and positioned on a pale brocade-like background, giving the pages the look of handpainted silk."

In The Greatest Power, a companion to The Empty Pot, emperor Ping wishes to bring the harmony of the heavens to his kingdom. Ping sends the children of the kingdom on a quest to find the greatest power in the world, with the advice, "A wise person must be able to see the unseen and know the unknown." Some children believe the greatest power involves money, beauty, or technology. But young Sing pays heed to the emperor's words, and returns with a lotus seed, which represents the life force. As her reward, Sing is named prime minister. "Demi ably combines striking artwork and a meaningful story, with quiet dignity and wisdom," observed Booklist critic Julie Cummins, and Linda M. Kenton, reviewing The Greatest Power in School Library Journal, complimented the work's "rich palette, attention to detail, and delightful depictions of youngsters."

Artisans figure in two further Chinese folktales, The Artist and the Architect and The Stonecutter. The former tells the story of a jealous artist who plots to get rid of the emperor's favorite architect, a book in which Demi's "signature style is as attractive as ever," according to Stephanie Zvirin writing in Booklist. Bright reds contrast with the "palest of peaceful pastels," noted Zvirin, and a surprise ending "is like a bolt from the blue." The Stonecutter is a Chinese equivalent of the "Fisherman and His Wife," wherein a dissatisfied stonecutter wishes to be changed into something more powerful, but in the end learns his calling is the best of all. "Combine this offering with any of Demi's many other fine picture books on China to enrich a social studies unit," declared Lauren Peterson in a Booklist review of The Stonecutter.

Demi has adapted other folktales, including The Hallowed Horse and One Grain of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale, from India and The Firebird from Russia. Kate McMullan, reviewing the last title in the New York Times Book Review, commented that "Demi's Firebird is a big, lavishly produced book with enough gold ink to satisfy the cravings of the greediest czar," and went on to describe Demi's elaborate illustrations as "a cross between a Hokusai print and a Fabergé egg," which provide "a feast for the eye."

Fables and nursery rhymes from China have also received the Demi treatment. Books such as A Chinese Zoo, Demi's Reflective Fables, and The Dragon's Tale and Other Animal Fables of the Chinese Zodiac provide moral lessons along with elegant artwork for young readers. Her interest in Buddhism is also apparent in a collection of jatakas, Buddhist tales with a lesson, gathered in Buddha Stories. Based on an original book printed from woodblocks in 600 A.D., Buddha Stories is illustrated in gold ink against navy blue pages which results in "a striking visual impact," according to Janice M. Del Negro writing in the Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books.

Chinese nursery rhymes are retold in Dragon Kites and Dragonflies, "a book to be enjoyed and treasured," according to Hanna B. Zeiger in Horn Book. Additionally, Demi's poetry anthologies, such as Demi's Secret Garden, including poems from around the world, and In the Eyes of the Cat, featuring Japanese poetry, have earned high praise. Reviewing the latter title, a collection of both haiku and tanka, Annette Curtis Klause concluded in School Library Journal that "the simple language and clear imagery … will attract young readers and perhaps instill in them a desire to explore poetry further."

Demi is also noted for her novelty books, her illustrations of the works of Hans Christian Andersen and other artists, and for several biographies for young readers. Among novelty books, she has created both number and alphabet books which employ game techniques for learning. Demi's Find the Animal A B C uses animals from A to Z to introduce the alphabet and also provides readers with the task of spotting more animals hidden in the illustrations. Booklist's Cheryl Penny dubbed this an "engaging puzzle book" which "will sharpen the basic prereading skill of discrimination." The artist did much the same for numbers skills with her Demi's Count the Animals 1, 2, 3, and also created a fold-out introduction to the ever-popular topic of dinosaurs with Find Demi's Dinosaurs. More animal games and lessons in basic skills are supplied in Demi's Opposites, while in her adaptation of Andersen's Thumbelina she creates a "vividly told tale" with colors that "will undoubtedly attract children," according to Booklist's Cooper.

Demi's biographies include The Adventures of Marco Polo, Chingis Khan, Buddha, and Gandhi. In the first, Demi details the Italian's journey from Venice to China in 1271 through both text and illustrations. In the second title, she draws from both folklore and history to give "a terse but colorful sketch" of the notorious Mongolian leader, according to Horn Book critic Margaret A. Bush. "The epic adventures of this legendary figure [are] beautifully served," Bush concluded. Writing in the Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, Betsy Hearne noted in particular the conclusion of the tale, "which is illustrated simply by layers of fused watercolor washes" that imply "time's erosion of physical conquest." In Booklist, Denia Hester concluded that this "handsome biography is a feast for the eyes from cover to cover, including the beautiful endpapers" and "a must for school and public libraries."

In Buddha, Demi brings her own affection for Buddhism to the recounting of Siddartha's life, from his birth and the prophecies surrounding it to his ultimate path to enlightenment. Horn Book reviewer Stephen Dawson praised both Demi's prose and accompanying refined illustrations, writing: "This notable achievement is not only a highly readable account of the Buddha's life but is also a thoughtful introduction to Buddhism." Demi recounts the life of the great Indian spiritual and political leader in Gandhi. A contributor in Horn Book wrote that Demi's "stylistic richness in this tale …, far from violating Gandhi's commitment to a spare life, honors and celebrates it." Patricia Lothrop-Green in School Library Journal remarked that "Demi's iconic illustrations and clear prose accord her subject's idealism the beauty and power it deserves."

After the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States, Demi was approached by Emma Dryden of Margaret K. McElderry Books to write a book about Muhammad, the prophet who founded Islam. "I realized after this event that Americans had a lot of misconceptions about Islam and that most don't know much about the roots of the Islamic religion," Dryden told Sally Lodge in Publishers Weekly. "I knew that if anyone could create a balanced, sensitive book for children about Muhammad and the beginnings of Islam, it would be Demi." The artist readily accepted the assignment, telling Lodge, "I am drawn to Muslim painting and architecture. I have for years collected Eastern art and I have a huge library of books on Islam, so I didn't have to look far to find resources to write the text and create the art" for the work. Muhammad is an "excellent retelling of the Prophet's life that combines beauty and scholarship," according to John Green in Booklist. Susan Scheps, writing in School Library Journal, noted that "Demi's carefully designed paint-and-ink illustrations … are done in the style of the Persian miniature." Several critics noted that the artist takes care to portray her subject only in silhouette; Islamic tradition states that Muhammad must not be depicted directly. In the words of Horn Book contributor Lolly Robinson, Demi "presents the origins of Islam with great respect."

King Midas: The Golden Touch "breathes new life into one of the oldest of cautionary tales," wrote Joanna Rudge Long in Horn Book. Demi portrays the king as a weak, foolish man given to making poor decisions. Serving as the judge for a music contest between the god Apollo and Pan, Midas chooses the discordant Pan, so angering Apollo that he gives the king a pair of donkey's ears. Later, as a reward for helping Dionysus, Midas asks for and is granted the golden touch. Long remarked that Demi's decision to reverse the order of the two events "demonstrates the king's lack of intelligence before his dimwitted wish to have everything he touches turn to gold," suggesting that Midas could eventually grow wiser. In School Library Journal, however, Susan Scheps stated that "Demi's terse, choppy retelling will not appeal to those who like classic tales left intact." A contributor to Kirkus Reviews noted that "this version captures the tale's humor along with its point, and the illustrations really light up the room."

In The Legend of Saint Nicholas, Demi offers a biography of the actual person who is closely associated with the modern-day Santa Claus. The self-illustrated work contains stories about the saint's life, including accounts of his good works and miracles, and it also explains the feast of Saint Nicholas which began in the Middle Ages. "Once again Demi has created an exquisitely illustrated introduction to the life of a famous historical figure," wrote a Kirkus Reviews contributor. Eva Mitnick, reviewing the work in School Library Journal, noted that the "greatest strength of the book is its straightforward, affectionate depiction" of Saint Nicholas. In Booklist, Ilene Cooper praised the artwork, stating that "careful design work is evident right through to the endpapers."

In her art, Demi has created a universe of marvels—dragons and dinosaurs and elegant golden versions of reality that attract children's eyes and bring the reader into her simple straightforward text. On the surface fanciful and seemingly effortless, her illustrations are in fact the result of painstaking efforts. As she recounted to Austin, "I'd draw a tiger a thousand times just to warm up and then I'd throw all those away and draw the real thing." Additionally, her delicate line drawings are often the result of a complicated layering process.

While her miniaturizations and the plenitude of images in her artwork are the result of much thoughtful work and planning, much also comes from following her inspiration, her Ch'i as she refers to it. Working with children in schools, she attempts to develop the "magic paintbrush" technique with young artists. Describing how she once had class after class paint all sorts of dinosaurs on long rolls of paper on the floor, she told Austin that "They found Ch'i, the essence of life, the breath, spirit and vital force of Heaven, always expansive and always growing." And it is this expansive quality for which Demi's art itself is regarded.

Biographical and Critical Sources

BOOKS

St. James Guide to Children's Writers, 5th edition, St. James Press (Detroit, MI), 1999.

PERIODICALS

Booklist, July 15, 1978, Denise M. Wilms, review of Lu Pan, the Carpenter's Apprentice, p. 1734; September 15, 1980, Barbara Elleman, review of Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, p. 113; February 1, 1986, Cheryl Penny, review of Demi's Find the Animal A B C: An Alphabet-Game Book, p. 808; May 15, 1987, Ilene Cooper, review of Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, p. 1444; March 1, 1989, Ilene Cooper, review of Thumbelina, p. 1189; April 1, 1990, Ilene Cooper, review of The Empty Pot, p. 1545; November 15, 1990, p. 662; May 15, 1991, Stephanie Zvirin, review of The Artist and the Architect, p. 1802; October 1, 1991, Denia Hester, review of Chingis Khan, p. 329; April 15, 1992, p. 1533; May 15, 1993, p. 1688; November 1, 1993, p. 526; August, 1994, Julie Corsaro, review of The Magic Tapestry: A Chinese Folktale, p. 2045; November 15, 1994, p. 606; July, 1995, Lauren Peterson, review of The Stonecutter, p. 1881; January 1 and 15, 1996, p. 846; April 1, 1996, Ilene Cooper, review of Buddha, p. 1358; September 15, 1996, Karen Morgan, review of The Dragon's Tale and Other Animal Fables of the Chinese Zodiac, p. 235; February 15, 1997, Ilene Cooper, review of Buddha Stories, p. 1017; March 1, 1997, Karen Morgan, review of One Grain of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale, p. 1166; May 1, 1997, Carolyn Phelan, review of Grass Sandals: The Travels of Basho, p. 1497; March 15, 1998, Ilene Cooper, review of The Dalai Lama: A Biography of the Tibetan Spiritual and Political Leader, p. 1240; August, 1998, Helen Rosenberg, review of The Greatest Treasure, p. 1998; March 1, 1999, Ilene Cooper, review of Kites: Magic Wishes That Fly up to the Sky, p. 1216; June 1, 1999, Linda Perkins, review of The Donkey and the Rock, p. 1832; June 1, 2000, Linda Perkins, review of The Emperor's New Clothes, p. 1907; June 1, 2001, John Green, review of Gandhi, p. 1866; June 1, 2003, John Green, review of Muhammad, p. 1795; October 1, 2003, Ilene Cooper, review of The Legend of Saint Nicholas, p. 332; January 1, 2004, review of Muhammad, p. 780; February 1, 2004, Julie Cummins, review of The Greatest Power, p. 980.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, September, 1978, review of Lu Pan, the Carpenter's Apprentice, p. 10; July, 1986, p. 206; February, 1988, pp. 114-115; January, 1992, Betsy Hearne, review of Chingis Khan, p. 123; May, 1992, p. 234; June, 1996, p. 330; February, 1997, p. 202; April, 1997, Janice M. Del Negro, review of Buddha Stories, p. 200; May, 2002, Janice M. Del Negro, review of King Midas: The Golden Touch.

Children's Literature in Education, number 3, 1994, pp. 169-190.

Emergency Librarian, September-October, 1997, review of Buddha Stories, p. 51; November-December, 1997, review of One Grain of Rice, p. 55.

Horn Book, May-June, 1987, Hanna B. Zeiger, review of Dragon Kites and Dragonflies: A Collection of Chinese Nursery Rhymes, p. 349; May-June, 1990, Ellen Fader, review of The Empty Pot, p. 342; January-February, 1991, p. 76; November-December, 1991, Margaret A. Bush, review of Chingis Khan, pp. 752-753; May-June, 1992, p. 349; January-February, 1994, p. 79; September-October, 1996, Stephen Dawson, review of Buddha, p. 611; March-April, 1998, Marilyn Bousquin, review of The Dalai Lama, p. 233; May, 2000, Joanna Rudge Long, review of The Emperor's New Clothes, p. 291; September, 2001, review of Gandhi, p. 609; May-June, 2002, Joanna Rudge Long, review of King Midas, p. 338; July-August, 2003, Lolly Robinson, review of Muhammad, pp. 477-478.

Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 1989, p. 1746; May 15, 1994, p. 697; May 15, 1995, p. 709; January 15, 1997, p. 140; April 15, 2002, review of King Midas, p. 566; June 15, 2003, review of Muhammad, p. 858; November 1, 2003, review of The Legend of Saint Nicholas, p. 1316; February 1, 2004, review of The Greatest Power, p. 131.

Language Arts, September, 2002, review of Gandhi, pp. 72-73.

New York Times Book Review, April 29, 1979, p. 31; April 20, 1980, Don Lessem, review of Where Is It?, p. 20; April 25, 1982, Elaine Edelman, review of The Adventures of Marco Polo, p. 33; December 3, 1990, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, review of The Empty Pot, p. B2; November 14, 1993, Cynthia Zarin, review of Demi's Dragons and Fantastic Creatures, p. 48; January 15, 1995, Kate McMullan, review of The Firebird: A Russian Folktale, p. 25; September 16, 2001, review of Gandhi, p. 26; November 21, 2003, Nicholas D. Kristof, "Children's Books," p. 16.

Publishers Weekly, January 18, 1980, review of Bong Nam and the Pheasants, p. 141; March 7, 1980, review of Where Is It?, p. 90; June 27, 1980, review of Liang and the Magic Paintbrush, p. 88; November 28, 1980, Jean F. Mercier, review of The Leaky Umbrella, p. 50; January 2, 1981, Jean F. Mercier, review of Dragon Night, p. 51; January 29, 1982, review of The Adventures of Marco Polo, p. 66; August 30, 1985, review of The Nightingale, p. 422; November 8, 1985, Jean F. Mercier, review of Demi's Find the Animal A B C, p. 60; May 30, 1986, review of Demi's Count the Animals 1, 2, 3, p. 62; November 28, 1986, Diane Roback, review of Dragon Kites and Dragon Flies, p. 73; April 24, 1987, Diane Roback, review of Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, p. 68; September 11, 1987, Diane Roback, review of Demi's Opposites, pp. 90-91; December 11, 1987, Diane Roback, review of The Hallowed Horse, p. 64; October 14, 1998, Kimberly Olson Fakih and Diane Roback, review of Demi's Reflective Fables, p. 69; February 9, 1990, Diane Roback, review of The Empty Pot, p. 59; March 1, 1991, review of The Artist and the Architect, p. 73; April 27, 1992, review of In the Eyes of the Cat: Japanese Poetry for All Seasons, p. 271; May 31, 1993, p. 53; July 19, 1993, review of Demi's Secret Garden, p. 53; November 1, 1993, review of Demi's Dragons and Fantastic Creatures, p. 78; May 2, 1994, review of The Magic Tapestry, p. 308; October 10, 1994, review of The Firebird, p. 70; May 15, 1995, review of The Stonecutter, p. 72; October 28, 1996, review of The Dragon's Tale and Other Animal Fables of the Chinese Zodiac, p. 81; January 27, 1997, review of One Grain of Rice, p. 106; August 17, 1998, p. 70; April 26, 1999, review of The Donkey and the Rock, p. 81; May 13, 2002, "Royal Subjects," p. 72; June 23, 2003, Sally Lodge, "Portrait of a Prophet: A Look at Demi's Process of Creating a Picture-Book Biography," pp. 23-24; September 22, 2003, review of The Legend of Saint Nicholas, p. 71.

School Library Journal, April, 1982, review of The Adventures of Marco Polo, p. 28; August, 1984, Beverly A. Maffei, review of Fat Gopal, p. 65; December, 1985, review of Demi's Find the Animal A B C, p. 70; December, 1986, Dana Whitney Pinizzotto, review of Dragon Kites and Dragonflies, p. 84; June-July, 1987, Susan Scheps, review of Chen Ping and His Magic Axe, p. 81; July, 1990, p. 58; December, 1991, p. 89; May, 1992, Annette Curtis Klause, review of In the Eyes of the Cat, p. 98; January, 1994, p. 105; August, 1994, p. 150; December, 1994, p. 97; May, 1995, p. 98; January, 1996, Denise Anton Wright, review of The Magic Gold Fish: A Russian Folktale, p. 104; March, 1996, Susan Powers, review of Eucalyptus Wings, p. 176; June, 1996, Susan Middleton, review of Buddha, p. 136; October, 1996, Diane S. Marton, The Dragon's Tale and Other Animal Fables of the Chinese Zodiac, p. 112; March, 1997, pp. 172-73; June, 1997, Patricia Lothrop-Green, review of Buddha Stories, p. 107; March, 1998, Patricia Lothrop-Green, review of The Dalai Lama, p. 194, and Anne Connor, review of Happy New Year!: Kung-hsi Fa-Ts'ai!, p. 194; September, 1998, Margaret A. Chang, review of The Greatest Treasure, p. 190; March, 1999, Margaret A. Chang, review of The Donkey and the Rock, p. 192; June, 1999, DeAnn Tabuchi, review of Kites, p. 112; August, 2001, Patricia Lothrop-Green, review of Gandhi, p. 167; May, 2002, Susan Scheps, review of King Midas, p. 136; August, 2003, Susan Scheps, review of Muhammad, pp. 172-173; October, 2003, Eva Mitnick, review of The Legend of Saint Nicholas, pp. 61-62; March, 2004, Linda M. Kenton, review of The Greatest Power, p. 156.

Teaching and Learning Literature, May-June, 1997, Patricia Austin, "Demi's Magic," pp. 43-55.

OTHER

Making Mosaics (short film on Demi's work), CBS-TV.

National Public Radio Web site, http://www.npr.org/ (March 15, 2004), "Demi's Muhammad: Author, Artist Brings Tale of Islam to Children."

Papertigers.org, http://www.papertigers.org/ (March 20, 2004), Naomi Beth Wakan, "Interview with Demi."

Simon & Schuster Online, http://www.simonsays.com/ (March 20, 2004), "Demi."*

Minfong Ho (1951-) Biography - Career, Awards, Honors, Writings, Sidelights - Personal, Addresses, Member, Work in Progress [next]

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