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Ann Goldring (1937-) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Member, Honors Awards, Writings, Work in Progress, Sidelights

spitfire canada children canadian

Born 1937, in Barrie, Ontario, Canada; Education: University of Toronto, B.P.H.E.; York University, B.Ed.

Agent—Transatlantic Literary Agency, 72 Glengowan Rd., Toronto, Ontario M4N 1G4, Canada.

Writer and poet; George Brown College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, instructor in writing; formerly a secondary school and adult education teacher.

Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators, and Performers, Haiku Canada (former vice president), Haiku Deer Park (founding member).

Book of the Year nomination, Canadian Library Association, 2002, for Spitfire.

Spitfire, Raincoast Books (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada), 2001.

Old Goat and the Much-Too-Tall Tree, Red Deer Press (Calgary, Alberta, Canada), 2003.

Contributor of haiku and longer poems to various poetry anthologies, newsletters, books, and magazines, including People's Poetry Letter, Basho Festival Dedicatory Anthology, The Blue Jean Collection, and Haiku Canada Newsletter.

The Third Stone, a children's novel; Where's Bunny, The Doll, The Hunt, and Make a Wish, picture books.

Long-time poet and writing teacher Ann Goldring published her first book, the children's tale Spitfire, in 2001. Spitfire is about Kathryn Lockhart, an eleven-year-old girl living in a small town in Ontario, Canada, during World War II. Kathryn's choices in life are constrained by the prejudices of her time, particularly sexism and classism, but she decides to fight against them to do as she likes. For her, this means entering a car into the formerly all-boys soapbox derby and becoming friends with several of the town's outcasts. Two of these friends include April, an unpopular girl from a coarser part of town who is the first female to enter the derby, and Taxi-Jo Toppings, the town's eccentric barber, who offers Kathryn the back room of the barber shop to use as a workshop for constructing her soapbox racer. Kathryn is motivated in part to become friends with April because she feels guilty about not doing anything to prevent her from being bullied by their classmates, making Spitfire "a succinct look at both the horror of bullying and the horror of being the quiet but disapproving onlooker," as Zoe Johnstone Guha explained in Resource Links. Spitfire is also useful for teaching children about life on the "home front" during World War II, noted Canadian Materials contributor Kristin Butcher. "Today's young readers might not pick up on all the allusions and nuances," she explained, but "sharing it with their elders may result in even more fascinating Overcoming gossip, threats, and her family's prejudices in World War II-era Ontario, eleven-year-old Kathryn joins a girl from the wrong side of town in entering a boys-only soapbox derby. (Cover illustration by Ljuba Levstek.) stories." Calling the story "short and satisfying," Booklist's Carolyn Phelan found that Goldring "paints a believable picture of life" as it existed for children growing up during the Second World War.

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

Booklist, May 15, 2002, Carolyn Phelan, review of Spitfire, p. 1607.

Canadian Materials, April 26, 2002, Kristin Butcher, review of Spitfire.

Resource Links, April, 2002, Zoe Johnstone Guha, review of Spitfire, pp. 21-23.

School Library Journal, April, 2002, Mary Mueller, review of Spitfire, p. 149.

ONLINE

Canadian Children's Book Camp Web Site, http://www.bookcamp.ca/ (October 6, 2003), "Ann Goldring."

Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators, and

Performers Web Site, http://www.canscaip.org/ (October 6, 2003), "CANSCAIP Members: Ann Goldring."

Transatlantic Literary Agency Web Site, http://www.tla1.com/ (November 11, 2003), "Ann Goldring."*

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Ann Goldring

It has been a while since we were in touch on the Dagmar ski trail or the Uxbridge hiking site when we discussed various matters including a broad insight into the publishing world .I now note that you have provided a reflection of your early yearsduring the WW II era in "Spitfire" which brings to mind my own experience in Argentina when we lived in a neighbourhood uncannily occupied by people of British and German descent. Rgentina , to which my parents moved in 1935 when I was 5, was a neutral country but it gave rise to a strong nationalistic fervour amongst the various national groups living therein. This resultd in many tense and challenging circumstances and even relatively mild gang fights amongst the Axis and Allied related kids while the war raged on - while we at all times retained our family links to Canada - primarily Toronto.It occured to me that these accounts provide a rather fascinating perspective of the WW II era from a child's perspective at either end of the continent. I would be pleased to hear from you . Hope everything is going well.

Doug Sirrs

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almost 3 years ago

It has been a while since we were in touch on the Dagmar ski trail or the Uxbridge hiking site when we discussed various matters including a broad insight into the publishing world. I now note that you have provided a reflection of your ealy years during the WWII era in "Spitfire" which brings to mind my own experience in Argentina when we lived in a neighbourhood uncannily occupied by people of British and German descent.Argentina, to which my parents moved in 1935,was a neutral country but it gave rise to a strong nationalistic fervour amongst the various national groups living therein.This gave rise to many tense
and challenging circumstnces and even relatively mild gang fights amongst the Allied and Axis related kids while the war raged on - while we at all times retained our family links to Canada - primarily Toronto. It occured to me that these accounts provide a rather fascinating perspective of the WW II era from a childs perspective at either end of the Continent.