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Janet Quin-Harkin (1941–) Biography - Personal, Addresses, Career, Member, Honors Awards, Writings, Sidelights

york review evan series

(Rhys Bowen, Janetta Johns)

Personal

Born 1941, in Bath, England; immigrated to United States, 1966; Education: University of London, B.A. (with honors), 1963; graduate study at University of Kiel and University of Freiburg. Religion: Roman Catholic. Hobbies and other interests: Tennis, travel, drama, music, sketching, hiking.

Addresses

Agent—Meg Ruley, Jan Rostrosen Agency, 318 E. 51st St., New York, NY 10011.

Career

British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), London, England, studio manager in drama department, 1963–66; Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Sydney, member of staff; writer, 1971—teacher of dance and drama, 1971–76; teacher of writing at Dominican College, San Rafael, CA, 1988–95. Founder and former director of San Raphael's Children's Little Theater. Full-time writer, beginning 1980.

Member

Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, American Association of University Women.

Honors Awards

Children's Book Showcase selection, Children's Book Council, Outstanding Books of the Year citation, New York Times, Children's Book Show citation, American Institute of Graphic Arts, and Best Books of the year citations, School Library Journal, Washington Post, and Saturday Review, all 1976, all for Peter Penny's Dance; Children's Choice citation, 1985, for Wanted: Date for Saturday Night; Barry Award nomination for Best Novel, 1998, for Evan Help Us; Agatha Award, Romantic Times Reviewer's Choice designation, and Herodotus Award, all 2002, all for Murphy's Law; Anthony Award for Best Historical Mystery, Bouchercon, 2004, for For the Love of Mike; Anthony Award for Best Short Story, 2004, for "Doppelganger"; Edgar Allan Poe Award finalist, Mystery Writers of America, 2004, for Evan's Gate.

Writings

FOR CHILDREN

Peter Penny's Dance, illustrated by Anita Lobel, Dial (New York, NY), 1976.

Benjamin's Balloon, Parents Magazine Press (New York, NY), 1979.

Septimus Bean and His Amazing Machine, illustrated by Art Cumings, Parents Magazine Press (New York, NY), 1980.

Magic Growing Powder, illustrated by Art Cumings, Parents Magazine Press (New York, NY), 1981.

Helpful Hattie, illustrated by Susanna Natti, Harcourt (New York, NY), 1983.

Three Impossible Things, Parents Magazine Press (New York, NY), 1991.

Billy and Ben: The Terrible Two, illustrated by Carol Newsom, Bantam (New York, NY), 1992.

YOUNG-ADULT NOVELS

Write Every Day, Scholastic (New York, NY), 1982.

(Under pseudonym Janetta Johns) The Truth about Me and Bobby V., Bantam (New York, NY), 1983.

Tommy Loves Tina, Berkley/Ace (New York, NY), 1984.

Winner Takes All, Berkley/Ace (New York, NY), 1984.

Wanted: Date for Saturday Night, Putnam (New York, NY), 1985.

Summer Heat, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

My Phantom Love ("Changes Romance" series), HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

On My Own ("Changes Romance" series), HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

Getting Personal: Becky, Silhouette (New York, NY), 1994.

The Apartment, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1994.

The Sutcliffe Diamonds, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1994.

The Boy Next Door ("Love Stories" series), Bantam (New York, NY), 1995.

Who Do You Love? ("Love Stories" series), Bantam (New York, NY), 1996.

(With Thomas P. Taafe) Fun, Sun, and Flamingos ("Club Stephanie" series), Bantam (New York, NY), 1997.

(With Emily Costello and Emily Ecco) Fireworks and Flamingoes ("Club Stephanie" series), Bantam (New York, NY), 1997.

Flamingo Revenge ("Club Stephanie" series), Pocket (New York, NY), 1997.

King and I (adapted from the animated movie and the musical), Scholastic (New York, NY), 1999.

Torn Apart ("Love Stories" series), Bantam (New York, NY), 1999.

Love Potion ("Enchanted Hearts" series), Avon (New York, NY), 1999.

"SWEET DREAMS" SERIES

California Girl, Bantam (New York, NY), 1981.

Love Match, Bantam (New York, NY), 1982.

Ten-Boy Summer, Bantam (New York, NY), 1982.

Daydreamer, Bantam (New York, NY), 1983.

The Two of Us, Bantam (New York, NY), 1984.

Exchange of Hearts, Bantam (New York, NY), 1984.

Ghost of a Chance, Bantam (New York, NY), 1984.

Lovebirds, Bantam (New York, NY), 1984.

101 Ways to Meet Mr. Right, Bantam (New York, NY), 1985.

The Great Boy Chase, Bantam (New York, NY), 1985.

Follow That Boy, Bantam (New York, NY), 1985.

My Secret Love, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

My Best Enemy, Bantam (New York, NY), 1987.

Never Say Goodbye, Bantam (New York, NY), 1987.

"ON OUR OWN" SERIES

On Our Own, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

The Graduates, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

The Trouble with Toni, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

Out of Love, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

Old Friends, New Friends, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

Best Friends Forever, Bantam (New York, NY), 1986.

"SUGAR AND SPICE" SERIES

Flip Side, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Tug of War, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Surf's Up, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

The Last Dance, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Nothing in Common, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Dear Cousin, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Two Girls, One Boy, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Trading Places, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1987.

Double Take, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

Make Me a Star, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

Big Sister, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

Out in the Cold, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

Blind Date, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

It's My Turn, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1988.

"HEARTBREAK CAFE" SERIES

No Experience Required, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

The Main Attraction, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

At Your Service, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

Catch of the Day, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

Love to Go, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

Just Desserts, Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

"FRIENDS" SERIES

Starring Tess and Ali, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

Tess and Ali and the Teeny Bikini, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

Boy Trouble for Tess and Ali, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

Tess and Ali, Going on Fifteen, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

"SENIOR YEAR" SERIES

Homecoming Dance, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

New Year's Eve, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

Night of the Prom, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

Graduation Day, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1992.

"BOYFRIEND CLUB" SERIES

Ginger's First Kiss, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1994.

Roni's Dream Boy, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1994.

Karen's Perfect Match, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1994.

Ginger's New Crush, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1994.

Queen Justine, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

Roni's Two-Boy Trouble, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

No More Boys, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

Karen's Lesson in Love, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

Roni's Sweet Fifteen, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

Justine's Babysitting, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

The Boyfriend Wars, Troll (Metuchen, NJ), 1995.

"TGIF!" SERIES

Sleepover Madness, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Friday Night Fright, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Four's a Crowd, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Forever Friday, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Toe-Shoe Trouble, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Secret Valentine, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

"SISTER, SISTER" SERIES

Cool in School, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

You Read My Mind, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

One Crazy Christmas, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Homegirl on the Range, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Star Quality, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

He's All That, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Summer Days, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

All Rapped Up, Pocket Books (New York, NY), 1997.

FOR ADULTS; "CONSTABLE EVANS MYSTERY" SERIES; UNDER PSEUDONYM RHYS BOWEN

Evans Above, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1997.

Evan Help Us, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1998.

Evanly Choirs, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1999.

Evan and Elle, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2000.

Evan Can Late, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2001.

Evans to Betsy, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2002.

Evans Only Knows, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2003.

Evans Gate, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2003.

Evan Blessed, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2005.

FOR ADULTS; "MOLLY MURPHY" SERIES; UNDER PSEUDONYM RHYS BOWEN

Murphy's Law, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2001.

Death of Riley, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2002.

For the Love of Mike, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2003.

In like Flynn, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2005.

Oh Danny Boy, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 2006.

OTHER

Madam Sarah (adult historical novel), Fawcett (New York, NY), 1990.

Fool's Gold (adult historical novel), HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1991.

Amazing Grace (adult historical fiction), HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1993.

The Secrets of Lake Success (based on the television miniseries created by David Stenn), Tor (New York, NY), 1993.

Trade Winds (based on the television miniseries created by Hugh Bush), Schoolfield/Caribbean Productions, 1993.

Contributor to Chandler Reading Program, five volumes, edited by Lawrence Carillo and Dorothy McKinley, Noble & Noble, 1967–72. Author of documentaries, radio plays, and scripts, including "Dandelion Hours," for British Broadcasting Corporation Radio, 1966. Contributor to periodicals, including Scholastic and Mother's Journal, and to anthologies, including Blood on Their Hands, 2004, and Ungodly Orders.

Author's works have been translated into other languages.

Sidelights

Janet Quin-Harkin's writing career has spanned numerous genres as well as two continents, several decades, and two names: her own and the pen name Rhys Bowen, under which she is the author of the popular "Constable Evans" and "Molly McGuire" mystery novels. Beginning her writing career in radio in her native England in the 1960s, Quin-Harkin soon to a new home in the United States, where she became known for her picture books and novels for teen readers. A prolific writer, Quin-Harkin's young-adult series include "Sweet Dreams," "Sugar and Spice," "Heartbreak Cafe," and "On Our Own," among others, and comprise novels featuring a group of characters involved in "the sort of lives that Middle America leads," as the author once described her work to SATA.

Born in Bath, England, Quin-Harkin published her first short story at age sixteen, and she eventually earned a bachelor's degree with honors from the University of London. Shortly after graduation, she worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) as a studio manager and also as a writer of what she once dubbed "fairly highbrow" radio and television plays. Moving to Australia to work for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, she met John Quin-Harkin. The couple married in 1966 and moved to the United States. Settling in the San Francisco Bay area, Quin-Harkin balanced the role of mother and writer, working first for a textbook company developing reading texts before writing her own books. Her first picture book, Peter Penny's Dance, was published in 1976, and set Quin-Harkin on a new career path: children's book author.

Inspired by the lyrics of a British folk song, Peter Penny's Dance features illustrations by Anita Lobel. Although the book earned critical praise and won numerous awards, it was followed by several years without sales as Quin-Harkin continued to raise her family while struggling to work at her craft. After she sold several titles to Parents Magazine Press, she began to establish her name in her new field, and in 1981 the chance to write a teen novel opened up even more opportunities. Her novel, California Girl, became the first installment in Bantam's "Sweet Dreams" series. The novel features a sixteen-year-old swimmer with Olympic aspirations. When Jenny's coach moves to Texas, the teen's family follows so that she can continue training. However, Texas is a far cry from Jenny's former home state, and she is now viewed as strange due to her devotion to her sport. Fortunately, Jenny finds a new friend in injured football player Mark, who helps her train for her dream: a spot on the Olympic team. Ella B. Fossum, writing in School Library Journal, called California Girl "a cut above the usual teenage love story," while Voice of Youth Advocates contributor Becky Johnson gave the novel "high marks for readability," calling the plot "fast-moving and the main character … serious-minded and independent."

Quin-Harkin's "Sweet Dreams" series quickly gained a loyal readership as it expanded to include novels such as Love Match, Daydreamer, and the best-selling Ten-Boy Summer, all of which blend sympathetic and generally well-drawn main characters with a formulaic but entertaining plot. In Love Match, which also involves an athletic theme, Joanna refuses to ensure boyfriend Rick's affection by letting him beat her at tennis. Ten-Boy Summer finds Jill and Toni determined to liven up their junior-year summer by breaking up with their respective boyfriends and betting on who will be the first to have dated ten boys. Sally Estes, reviewing Ten-Boy Summer for Booklist, described the novel's premise "a bit farfetched,… but light and lively enough to attract nondemanding readers of teenage romances." Similarly, Susan Levine wrote in the Voice of Youth Advocates that Ten-Boy Summer "satisfies its requirements of a fast, uncomplicated, lightly romantic story with a happy ending."

The "Sweet Dreams" books sparked not just a new writing direction for Quin-Harkin, but also a major trend in young-adult publishing. Criticized by some as lacking in substance and praised by others as an encouragement to reading, teen books such as those Quin-Harkin produced became a staple of juvenile publishing, accounting for hundreds of thousands of sales annually. Writing to a tight schedule throughout the 1980s and well into the 1990s, she developed nine separate teen series, all of which focus on the concerns of contemporary teenage girls: what happens when a teen and her best friend break up, when a family moves, or when parents divorce? Most often there are young men involved: boys a girl wants to date, or love from afar, or beat at tennis. Other young-adult series from Quin-Harkin include "Sugar and Spice," "On Our Own," "Heartbreak Cafe," "Senior Year," "Boyfriend Club," "TGIF!," and "Sister, Sister," as well as "Friends," a series aimed at preteens that follows the relationship between two girls over summers spent together in a small resort town.

In between penning her many books for teen readers, Quin-Harkin also found time to author non-series fiction for adolescents. In her popular and award-winning novel Wanted: Date for Saturday Night the central problem is finding shy Julie a date for the freshman formal, while Summer Heat introduces teen protagonist Laurie Beth who, while on the verge of graduating from high school, must choose between two suitors and two completely different lifestyles. She has also penned the adult historical novels Madam Sarah and Fool's Gold, which deal with the "gold rush" eras in both California and Australia.

Beginning with Evans Above in 1997, Quin-Harkin started a new phase of her career, and began writing the type of books she most enjoys reading: mystery novels. Her "Constable Evans" series features Welsh policeman Evan Evans, and is set in the bucolic village of Llan-fair, a town modeled on a small village the author loved as a child. For her "Constable Evans" books, as well as a second mystery series featuring young detective Molly Murphy, Quin-Harkin decided to use her Welsh grand-father's name, Rhys Bowen, as a way to keep her teen and adult writing separate.

In Evans Above young Evan Evans, a North Wales constable, is assigned to the village of Llanfair where he is known locally as Evans the Law due to the many residents sharing the name Evans. The town proves to be anything but tranquil, however; in one single day, two hikers presumably fall to their deaths on Mount Snowdon, while a third is discovered in a cave with his throat cut. Up to his ears in crime, the young constable also finds himself pursued by every eligible young lady in Llanfair. Reviewing Evans Above for School Library Journal, Judy McAloon cited the book's "well-crafted plot, nicely drawn characters, [and] strong sense of place," concluding that young-adult readers would enjoy both the book's setting and protagonist, "a hero who is young enough to feel self-conscious with women."

Constable Evans returns in Evan Help Us, Evanly Choirs, Evan and Elle, and Evan Blessed. An eligible bachelor, he is pursued by a woman who moves into the village with her daughter in Evan Help Us, until murder intrudes when a visitor from London claims to have found the ruins of Camelot near Llansfair, then loses his life. In Evanly Choirs the constable adds his voice to the local choir's preparations for an annual music festival, but things hit a sour note when a famous opera star vacationing in town winds up dead. Feminine wiles again come into play in Evan and Elle when an eligible widow opens a French restaurant and attempts to win the stomach—and heart—of the good constable away from his real sweetheart, the ever-true schoolmarm Bronwen Price. When Madame's restaurant burns to the ground, suspicion leads to Welsh extremists until a charred body turns the investigation into a homicide. And in Evan Blessed the search for a missing teen yields evidence of more grisly goings on, while on the home front Evan's parents prove themselves to be problematic in-laws. Booklist reviewer Jenny McLarin called Evanly Choirs a "charming tale" and a "perfect book to curl up with on a rainy day," while Evan and Elle was described as "a slight confection of a mystery" by a Publishers Weekly reviewer who added that the novel is "sweetened with the author's obvious affection for her characters, as well as for all things Welsh." Praising Quin-Harken's "smooth, fast-paced" narrative, a Publishers Weekly contributor noted that in Evan Blessed she "keeps the suspense slowly building to a satisfying and tidy conclusion," and a Kirkus reviewer deemed Evan "likeable and resourceful."

Also published under Quin-Harkin's Bowen pseudonym, the "Molly Murphy" mystery series takes readers back to the turn of the twentieth century to introduce its spunky immigrant Irish sleuth in Murphy's Law. Recently arrived mystery in New York City after escaping from a rapist in her native Ireland, Murphy tackles a murder on Ellis Island, as well as navigating Hell's Kitchen and the city's Irish ghetto with two small children in tow, having promised their mother to reunite them with their father. In Death of Riley, against the urging of potential romantic interest Police Captain Daniel Sullivan, Murphy becomes an apprentice gumshoe, but winds up investigating the inconvenient death of her employer. The search for a killer soon expands to include a ring of anarchists and a plot to assassinate President William B. McKinley. At the helm of Riley's small detective agency in For the Love of Mike, Murphy finds herself embroiled in the theft of fashion designs, and going undercover in her investigation means working long hours in a New York garment district sweatshop. And as New York City is brought to a halt by the 1902 typhoid epidemic, Murphy escapes to points north, employed by an influential upstate politician to extricate his wife from the influences of a pair of suspicious spiritualists in In like Flynn.

Although noting that the "Molly Murphy" novels lack the lighthearted humor of Quin-Harkin's quaintly titled "Constable Evans" series, Rex E. Klett wrote in Library Journal that the award-winning series opener promises "a strong focus, great characters, and authentic period descriptions." "Molly is a smart, feisty, independent heroine," noted Booklist reviewer Sue O'Brien in a review of Death of Riley, while in Publishers Weekly a critic wrote that the author "nicely blends history and fiction" in a "light romantic mystery [that] should please most cozy fans." Praising In like Flynn as "absorbing" and "well-plotted," a reviewer for Publishers Weekly added that Quin-Harkin's energetic heroine bravely confronts both the mystery before her and a difficult issue in her own past in a "Molly Murphy" novel that "comes to a bittersweet and heartfelt conclusion."

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

Booklist, May 1, 1976, p. 1270; October 1, 1981, p. 189; January 15, 1982, p. 644; September 1, 1982, Sally Estes, review of Ten-Boy Summer, p. 37; May 15, 1983, Ilene Cooper, review of Daydreamer, p. 1221; February 1, 1984, p. 810; February 15, 1984, p. 862; June 15, 1984, p. 1474; October, 1998, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of Evan Helps Us, p. 224; April, 15, 1999, Jenny McLarin, review of Evanly Choirs, p. 1446; December 15, 1999, Jenny McLarin, review of Evan and Elle, p. 759; December 1, 2000, David Pitt, review of Evan Can Wait, p. 695; August, 2001, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of Murphy's Law, p. 2095; January 1, 2002, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of Evans to Betsy, p. 816; November 1, 2002, Sue O'Brien, review of Death of Riley, p. 476; March 15, 2004, Sue O'Brien, review of Evan's Gate, p. 1269; February 1, 2005, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of In like Flynn, p. 944.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, October, 1976, Zena Sutherland, review of Peter Penny's Dance, p. 30; March, 1982, review of Love Match, p. 136; February, 1984, review of Helpful Hattie, p. 116; June, 1985, review of Wanted: A Date for Saturday Night, p. 192.

Horn Book, June, 1976, Ethel L. Heins, review of Peter Penny's Dance, p. 281; February, 1984, review of Helpful Hattie, p. 48.

Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 1997, review of Evans Above; April 28, 1999, review of Evanly Choirs; August 15, 2001, review of Murphy's Law, p. 1164; December 15, 2001, review of Evans to Betsy, p. 1723; October 1, 2002, review of Death of Riley, p. 1427; October 1, 2003, review of For the Love of Mike, p. 1201; February 1, 2005, review of In like Flynn, p. 149.

Kliatt, spring, 1982, p. 10; spring, 1983, p. 5; fall, 1985, Elaine Patterson, review of 101 Ways to Meet Mr. Right, p. 16; May 15, 2005, review of Evan Blessed, p. 564.

Library Journal, December, 1997, Rex E. Klett, review of Evans Above, p. 159; March 1, 2000, Rex E. Klett, review of Evan and Elle, p. 128; January 1, 2001, Rex E. Klett, review of Evan Can Wait, p. 162; October 1, 2001, Rex E. Klett, review of Murphy's Law, p. 145; March 1, 2002, Rex E. Klett, review of Evans to Betsy, p. 144; December, 2003, Rex E. Klett, review of For the Love of Mike, p. 171; April 1, 2004, Rex E. Klett, review of Evan's Gate, p. 128; February 1, 2005, Rex E. Klett, review of In like Flynn, p. 57.

New York Times Book Review, May 9, 1976, p. 12; November 14, 1976, p. 53; April 1, 1979, p. 37; October 25, 1998, p. 43.

Publishers Weekly, January 20, 1984, review of Helpful Hattie, p. 89; July 25, 1986, review of My Secret Love, p. 192; December 22, 1989, review of No Experience Required, p. 57; June 29, 1990, review of Summer Heat, p. 103; May 24, 1991, review of Starring Tess and Ali, p. 58; August 17, 1998, review of Evan Help Us, p. 52; April 15, 1999, review of Evanly Choirs, p. 226; January 10, 2000, review of Evan and Elle, p. 48; November 13, 2000, review of Evan Can Wait, p. 88; September 3, 2001, review of Murphy's Law, p. 67; February 18, 2002, review of Evans to Betsy, p. 79; November 18, 2002, Sue O'Brien, review of Death of Riley, p. 476; February 3, 2003, review of Evan Only Knows, p. 58; November 3, 2003, review of For the Love of Mike, p. 57; March 29, 2004, review of Evan's Gate, p.42; February 28, 2005, review of In like Flynn, p. 45; May 30, 2005, review of Evan Blessed, p. 42; May 24, 1991, review of Starring Tess and Ali, p. 58.

School Library Journal, November, 1981, Ella B. Fossum, review of California Girl, p. 110; March, 1982, Joe McKenzie, review of Love Match, p. 160; October, 1982, review of Ten-Boy Summer, p. 158; May, 1983, review of Daydreamer, p. 84; September, 1986, Kathy Fritts, review of The Graduates and The Trouble with Toni, p. 148; January, 1987, Kathy Fritts, review of Growing Pains, p. 88; October, 1987, Kathy Fritts, review of Two Girls, One Boy, p. 150; January, 1988, Kathy Fritts, review of Trading Places and Flip Side and Nothing in Common, p. 95; January, 1989, Doris Fong, review of It's My Turn, p. 104; April, 1989, Doris Fong, review of Campus Cousins and Home Sweet Home, p. 127; October, 1989, Doris Fong, review of One Step Too Far, p. 144; May, 1998, Judy McAloon, review of Evans Above, p. 175; May, 2001, Pam Johnson, review of Evan Can Wait, p. 175.

Times Educational Supplement, April 21, 1995, p. 16.

Voice of Youth Advocates, December, 1981, Becky Johnson, review of California Girl, p. 34; December, 1982, Susan Levine, review of Ten-Boy Summer, p. 35; December, 1983, Maureen Ritter, review of Daydreamer, p. 281; December, 1986, review of Old Friends, New Friends, p. 228; December, 1987, review of Two Girls, One Boy, p. 241; April, 1988, Laurel Ibey, review of Flip Side, and Juli Lund, review of The Last Dance, p. 35; April, 1989, review of It's My Turn, p. 38; June, 1989, review of Home Sweet Home, p. 112; February, 1991, review of Summer Heat, p. 355; October, 1994, p. 215; December, 1994, p. 279.

ONLINE

Rhys Bowen Web site, http://www.jqh.home.netcom.com (October 20, 2005).

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